Of course, it is not practical to wait forever for confirmation: in the meantime, it is sometimes better to assume that silence implies consensus. You can keep this assumption (hopefully safe) until someone changes the page by reworking it or resetting it. The more visible the statement is and the more unchallenged it remains, the stronger the consensus implication. 3. Silence is deemed broken when a participating state has written to the President of an objection or amendment before the expiry of the period of silence. In this case, the President immediately informs the participating States in writing that the decision in question has not been adopted. A procedure of silence or a tacit acceptance procedure[1] (in French: tacit approval procedure; Latin: who agrees to empty, “the one who is silent is led to consent,” “silence implies/means consent”) is a means of formally adopting texts, often, but not exclusively in the international political context. The maxim is “Who tacet consents”: the maxim of the law is “silence gives its consent.” So if you want to expose what my silence is silent, you have to make sure that I have accepted. Apply the rule of silence and consensus only if a weak consensus is sufficient. Silence and consensus do not apply when strong consensus or mandatory discussion is required. If real people are affected by a decision, such as blocking users. B or the use of material covered by biographies of the politics of the living people, a positive confirmation is preferred. But even in these cases, disagreements may arise later and it is no longer appropriate to adopt a consensus.

1. The President may propose the adoption of a decision as part of a procedure of silence. Such a proposal must be made at a meeting, specifying the exact date of the expiry of the silence period. If a representative does not object to this meeting, the decision is deemed tacit. The expression of the procedure of silence appears in Appendix 1, Point A), “Application of a procedure of silence in the Permanent Council and the Security Cooperation Forum” of the OSCE Internal Regulation (2006)” … 4] …